Accuracy Guaranteed.

Find Out Your Chances of Admission at Columbia University

As one of the Ivy League Colleges, Columbia University ranks among the most selective colleges in the U.S. But every year thousands of talented applicants are accepted… could you be one of them? If you’re curious about your chances of admission at Columbia, Go4Ivy can help by calculating your highly accurate and guaranteed chances of admission.

Our son managed to get accepted at 12 of 13 schools he applied to, all except Amherst which would have been a 50:50 reach but in fact go4college accurately predicted his slight chances, since he ended up not being recruited which would have dropped his odds considerably....Very worthwhile investment in planning a repertoire of schools. Better than Princeton Review which we were initially using which predicted reaches at most of the schools that your program gave solid support to. Happy to endorse your service to future parents/students.

— G.M., Parent, Fairfield, CA

The History of Columbia University

Columbia University was founded in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of King George II of England. It is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York and the fifth oldest in the United States.

Controversy preceded the founding of the College, with various groups competing to determine its location and religious affiliation. Advocates of New York City met with success on the first point, while the Anglicans prevailed on the latter. However, all constituencies agreed to commit themselves to principles of religious liberty in establishing the policies of the College.

In July 1754, Samuel Johnson held the first classes in a new schoolhouse adjoining Trinity Church, located on what is now lower Broadway in Manhattan. There were eight students in the class. At King's College, the future leaders of colonial society could receive an education desied to "enlarge the Mind, improve the Understanding, polish the whole Man, and qualify them to support the brightest Characters in all the elevated stations in life." One early manifestation of the institution's lofty goals was the establishment in 1767 of the first American medical school to grant the M.D. degree.

The American Revolution brought the growth of the college to a halt, forcing a suspension of instruction in 1776 that lasted for eight years. However, the institution continued to exert a significant influence on American life through the people associated with it. Among the earliest students and trustees of King's College were John Jay, the first chief justice of the United States; Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of the treasury; Governor Morris, the author of the final draft of the U.S. Constitution; and Robert R. Livingston, a member of the five-man committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence.

The college reopened in 1784 with a new name—Columbia—that embodied the patriotic fervor that had inspired the nation's quest for independence. The revitalized institution was recognizable as the descendant of its colonial ancestor, thanks to its inclination toward Anglicanism and the needs of an urban population, but there were important differences: Columbia College reflected the legacy of the Revolution in the greater economic, denominational, and geographic diversity of its new students and leaders. Cloistered campus life gave way to the more common phenomenon of day students who lived at home or lodged in the city.

In 1857, the College moved from Park Place, near the present site of city hall, to 49th Street and Madison Avenue, where it remained for the next forty years. During the last half of the nineteenth century, Columbia rapidly assumed the shape of a modern university. The Columbia School of Law was founded in 1858. The country's first mining school, a precursor of today's Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, was established in 1864 and awarded the first Columbia Ph.D. in 1875.

Get Chances of Admission!

Back to Top