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Find Your Chances of Admission to Dartmouth College

As one of the Ivy League colleges, Dartmouth College ranks among the most selective colleges in the U.S. If you’re curious about your chances of admission to Dartmouth, Go4Ivy can help by calculating your chances of being accepted by Dartmouth. In 2001, Go4Ivy developed a separate statistically-based algorithm for each Ivy League college and university (includingDartmouth), which predicts students’ chances of being accepted by each school. These algorithms are continually updated and revised as schools change their admission criteria and their approaches. Over the last 15 years our predictions have been over 90% correct (100% correct the last two years). Go4Ivy refunds the fee for any school for which its prediction turns out to be incorrect. We are proud to have an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau. 

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The History of Dartmouth College

The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock, a Congregational minister from Connecticut, founded Dartmouth College in 1769. He had earlier established Moor's Charity School in Lebanon, Connecticut, principally for the education of Native Americans. In seeking to expand his school into a college, Wheelock relocated his educational enterprise to Hanover, in the Royal Province of New Hampshire. Samson Occom, a Mohegan Indian and one of Wheelock's first students, was instrumental in raising substantial funds for the College. The Royal Governor of New Hampshire, John Wentworth, provided the land upon which Dartmouth would be built and on December 13, 1769, conveyed the charter from King George III establishing the College. That charter created a college "for the education and instruction of Youth of the Indian Tribes in this Land ... and also of English Youth and any others." Named for William Legge, the Second Earl of Dartmouth - an important supporter of Eleazar Wheelock's efforts - Dartmouth is the nation's ninth oldest college.

The Supreme Court decision in the famous "Dartmouth College Case" of 1819, argued by Daniel Webster (Class of 1801), is considered to be one of the most important and formative documents in United States constitutional history, strengthening the contract clause of the Constitution and thereby paving the way for all American private institutions to conduct their affairs in accordance with their charters and without interference from the state.

An Ivy League institution, Dartmouth College enrolls approximately 4,100 undergraduates in the liberal arts and 1,700 graduate students. In addition to 19 graduate programs in the arts and sciences, it is home to the nation's fourth oldest medical school: the Dartmouth Medical School, founded in 1797; the nation's first professional school of engineering: the Thayer School of Engineering, founded in 1867; and the first graduate school of management in the world: the Tuck School of Business, established in 1900.

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