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Get Your Chances of Admission to Ivy League Colleges & Universities

One of the top, most selective group of colleges and universities are the Ivy League schools, which include: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Pennsylvania, Princeton and Yale. In 2001, Go4Ivy developed a separate algorithm for each Ivy League college and university which predicts students’ chances of being accepted by each school. These algorithms are continually updated and revised as the schools change their admission criteria and their approaches. Over the last 15 years our predictions have been over 90% correct (100% correct for the last two years). Go4Ivy refunds the fee for any school for which its prediction turns out to be incorrect. We are proud to have an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau.

While each Ivy has high academic standards and strict requirements for admission, they are significantly different from each other in their admission criteria, focus, location, number of undergraduates, campus setting and in many other ways. Go4Ivy has gathered below key data for each Ivy, which gives the flavor of each school and provides convenient links to each school’s website for any additional information.  

Once you select the Ivy League colleges and universities, which you like, you can obtain your chances of getting accepted by the colleges and universities which you selected. Using algorithms that we developed and perfected for each Ivy League college and university, we can evaluate your data that the admissions offices would consider, in view of the school’s requirements and criteria. Go4Ivy calculates a single number: your chances of getting accepted by that school. Your chances of admission are reported and compared with the chances of an average applicant. View a sample ChancesR™ report

We understand that anyone can give you predictions of your chances of admission, so why should you trust our predictions?  We’ve been predicting chances of admission since 2001 and we are the only service which refunds the fee for any prediction that turns out to be incorrect. Our predictions have been over 90% accurate and 100% accurate for the last two years. See Accuracy Guaranteed icon for details.

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Brown University

45 Prospect Street
Providence, RI 02912
(401) 863-2378
www.brown.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 9%
  • Enrollment: 6,200 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Social Sciences–23%
    • Biology–12%
    • Ethnic Studies–6%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT with writing, essay

Columbia University

1130 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10027
(212) 854-2522
www.columbia.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 7%
  • Enrollment: 6,200 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Engineering–22%
    • Social Sciences–20%
    • Biology–10%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT or ACT with writing, SAT Subject Tests, essay

Cornell University

410 Thurston Avenue
Ithaca, NY 14850
www.cornell.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 14%
  • Enrollment: 14,300 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Engineering–16%
    • Business/Marketing–13%
    • Agriculture–13%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT or ACT with writing, essay

Dartmouth College

6016 McNutt Hall
Hanover, NH 03755
(603) 646-2875
www.dartmouth.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 12%
  • Enrollment: 4,100 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Social Sciences–43%
    • Biology–10%
    • Engineering –8%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT or ACT, SAT Subject Tests, essay

Harvard University

86 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
(617) 495-1551
www.harvard.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 6%
  • Enrollment: 6,650 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Social Sciences–32%
    • Biology–14%
    • History–9%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT or ACT, SAT Subject Tests, essay, interview

University of Pennsylvania

1 College Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19104
www.upenn.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 10%
  • Enrollment: 9,750 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Business/Marketing–21%
    • Social Sciences–16%
    • Health Sciences–10%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT with writing, essay

Princeton University

Princeton, NJ 08544
www.princeton.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 7%
  • Enrollment: 5,260 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Social Sciences–26%
    • Engineering–20%
    • Biology–10%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT or ACT, SAT Subject Tests, essay

Yale University

149 Elm Street
New Haven, CT 06520
(203) 432-9300
www.yale.edu

  • Acceptance Rate: 6%
  • Enrollment: 5,400 undergraduates
  • Most Popular Majors:
    • Social Sciences–27%
    • biology–10%
    • Interdisciplinary Studies–8%
  • Admissions Requirements:
    SAT and SAT Subject Tests or ACT with writing, essay

About the Ivy League Colleges

The Ivy League colleges share high academic standards, historic pedigrees, and an athletic conference. But although the Ivies are often talked about as a group, each of the eight Ivy League colleges (Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Penn, Princeton and Yale), differ from each other in many significant respects including academic focus, number of undergraduates, and the feel and campus type.

The Ivy League schools also have different admissions criteria and standards, so a student’s chance of admission typically varies significantly from Ivy to Ivy. If you’re curious about which Ivies you are more likely to get into, Go4Ivy can calculate your chances of admission at the Ivy League colleges and other top schools.

History of the Ivy League

The term Ivy League commonly refers to a group of eight, east-coast colleges and universities renowned for their high academic standards and significant history. These schools were some of the earliest American institutions founded: Harvard in 1636, Yale in 1701, Penn in 1740, Princeton in 1746, Columbia in 1754, Brown in 1764, Dartmouth in 1769 and Cornell in 1865.

Taken more literally, the Ivy League refers to the athletic conference in which the eight colleges' sports teams compete. The term 'Ivy League' was conceived in the 1930s by Stanley Woodward, a New York Herald Tribune sports writer. It was not until years later that an official coalition was actually formed by the universities.

In 1945, the presidents of each university created committees whose tasks were to establish athletic policies on issues like eligibility, budgets, and length of season play. These policies were (and still are) meant to balance scholarship and athletics. Although Ivy League sports teams compete in Division I athletics, the schools do not offer athletic scholarships and maintain the same academic standards for both athletes and non-athletes.

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